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Support.com Joins BroadJump on Broadband Support Package

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Posted December 5, 2001 By Michael Singer     Feedback

Two software makers pool their resources and anticipate good times ahead for broadband providers and come up with a new self-service and assisted service suite.

Hoping to make sense of the seemingly unmanned broadband sector, two software makers decided there is safety in numbers.

Redwood City-based Support.com Wednesday says it is joining forces with broadband software provider BroadJump Inc., to offer a good support solution created specifically for the needs of broadband service providers.

The solution will be a hybrid of Austin, Texas-based BroadJump's installation and connection management technology with Support.com's Resolution Suite software platform.

The idea is to give enable subscribers with "point-and-click" self-service and assisted service, starting from the time of installation and continuing throughout the entire subscriber lifecycle.

The two companies think they've got a good head start on the initiative. Together BroadJump and Support.com customer bases serve over 60 percent of the broadband subscriber market in North America.

"The demand for high-speed Internet access should not be slowed by lack of acceptable customer service and support," says Support.com chairman and CEO Radha Basu. "Our joint product and marketing arrangement with BroadJump should help quicken the pace of broadband adoption by giving broadband service providers a proven, integrated and scalable customer service solution that eases deployment, reduces expenses, and assists with subscriber retention through always-on, always-accessible automated support."

And despite the fumbled attempts of @Home in the broadband sector, the companies say the Broadband Resolution Suite is going to be hot property.

Cahner's In-Stat Group forecasts that the number of broadband subscribers will top the 21 million mark globally by the end of 2001 and reach nearly 84 million by 2005. In addition, subscribership in the United States is expected to increase from 6.8 million to more than 19 million between 2000 and 2002.

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